Chemical elements
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Platinum Applications





Applications

Platinum is used in precision instruments, resistance thermometers for wide range high-accuracy temperature measurements. Platinum-rhodium thermocouples containing from 60 to 99 % platinum: their temperature range may reach 2000°C. A lighter with tiniest platinum wire invented in Hungary gives stable wind-resistant flame.

A lot of platinum is applied in decorations. The most of decorative platinum is consumed by such a small country as Japan. Meanwhile such important industries as oil-processing industry, glass production and electrical engineering industries consume only several percent of the entire produced platinum. Platinum is also used in commemorative coins.

Platinum is used in four different fields, namely, for chemical, electrical, and dental purposes, and for jewellery. For chemical purposes platinum is required both as metal and in the form of salts. The metal is used in the manufacture of crucibles, pyrometers, and for such apparatus as is required to withstand corrosive chemicals or high temperatures. Its salts are used in chemical analysis.

Platinum salts are useful in the production of certain photographic papers, which are of special value inasmuch as the photographic impression yielded by them is of superior quality and permanence.

Considerable quantities of platinum are used in preparing the catalyst required for contact-process sulphuric acid works. In 1915 about 44,000 oz. of the metal were used for this purpose, the loss per ton of acid ranging from a minute amount up to 0.25 gram.

Considerable quantities of platinum are required for electrical purposes. For example, electric furnaces use fairly large amounts of platinum; and the metal is also employed in the form of contact points.

It is estimated that about one-third of the total consumption of platinum is in dentistry, for which purpose it is used as pins in teeth, as foil, plate, and filling. Jewellery also absorbs an equal amount of platinum.


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